Classical Theory Of Crime Essay Topics

Classical Theory of Criminology Essay

1523 Words7 Pages

Criminology is the study of why individuals engage or commit crimes and the reasons as to why they behave in certain ways in different situations (Hagan, 2010). Through understanding the reasons or why an individual commits a crime, one can come up with ways to prevent and control crime or rehabilitate criminals. There exist a large number of criminology theories, some link crime to an individual or person; they believe a person weighs the cons and pros and makes a conscious decision on whether to commit or not commit a felony. Others see the society as having a duty to make sure that its members do not engage in criminal acts by providing a secure and safe living place. Some claim that some people have hidden or dormant characteristics…show more content…

According to this theory, the rational remedy for preventing crimes would be establishing harsher punishments or sentences for committing crimes. Cesare Beccaria is considered to be the classical theory founder. His concept even in today’s world continues to play a significant role in many countries legal systems, however, this approach happens to be more flexible in the modern world.
Cesare Beccaria theory emerged as a result of a reaction against the barbaric system of justice, punishment and law present before 1789. It mainly emphasized on human rationality and free will (Beccaria, 1986). The classical criminology theory was not concerned in studying and understanding criminals, but concentrated on legal processing and law making. According to the theory, crime was believed to be an activity engaged or committed out of free will and that criminals weighed their actions consequences. Punishment is established or developed in order to prevent individuals from engaging in criminal acts and it should be greater than the benefits of criminal acts (Akers & Sellers, 2012). The classical theory stressed on the legal crime definition rather than emphasizing on what defined or determined criminal behavior. It is essential to understand the background in

Show More

Classical Theory Of Criminology Essay

Criminology is the study of why individuals engage or commit crimes and the reasons as to why they behave in certain ways in different situations (Hagan, 2010). Through understanding the reasons or why an individual commits a crime, one can come up with ways to prevent and control crime or rehabilitate criminals. There exist a large number of criminology theories, some link crime to an individual or person; they believe a person weighs the cons and pros and makes a conscious decision on whether to commit or not commit a felony. Others see the society as having a duty to make sure that its members do not engage in criminal acts by providing a secure and safe living place. Some claim that some people have hidden or dormant characteristics that determine their reaction or behavior when confronted or put in particular negative conditions (Akers & Sellers, 2012). By understanding and studying these theories, together with applying them to people, psychologists and authorities can prevent criminals from committing or repeating crimes and aid in their rehabilitation. As many theories have emerged over time, they continue to be surveyed and explored, both individually and in combination in order for criminologists to develop solutions and eventually reduce the levels and types of crime. The most popular criminology theories emphasize on the individual, positivist and classical traits. This paper will explore the classical theory, which is among the earliest theories in criminology.
Classical criminology theory is a legal systems approach, which emerged in the 1700s age of enlightenment. Various philosophers like John Locke, Jeremy Bentham and Cesare Beccaria expanded upon the theory of the social contract to explain the reasons as to why people commit offenses, and interventions through which communities can combat crime effectively. The basic foundation of this theory is the believe that people commit crime or engage in illegal activities when they view the benefits of committing a crime as being greater than the possible costs or punishments (Hagan, 2010). According to this theory, the rational remedy for preventing crimes would be establishing harsher punishments or sentences for committing crimes. Cesare Beccaria is considered to be the classical theory founder. His concept even in today’s world continues to play a significant role in many countries legal systems, however, this approach happens to be more flexible in the modern world.
Cesare Beccaria theory emerged as a result of a reaction against the barbaric system of justice, punishment and law present before 1789. It mainly emphasized on human rationality and free will (Beccaria, 1986). The classical criminology theory was not concerned in studying and understanding criminals, but concentrated on legal processing and law making. According to the theory, crime was believed to be an activity engaged or committed out of free will and that criminals weighed their actions consequences. Punishment...

Loading: Checking Spelling

0%

Read more

A Critical Evaluation of The Issue of Taking an Item from Work

2290 words - 9 pages The act of stealing items from work can be considered as a crime under criminal statute. The theft act 1968 states that a person is guilty of committing a crime of theft if that person ‘dishonestly appropriates property belonging to another with the intention of permanently depriving’. In saying that the four main criminological presepectives, which include: classical, positivist, interactionist critical criminology, interpret the act of...

VIEWS OF PUNISHMENT: CLASSICAL AND POSITIVIST

828 words - 3 pages VIEWS OF PUNISHMENT: CLASSICAL AND POSITIVISTPOSITIVIST AND CLASSICAL PUNISHMENTAUI OnlineKevin HensleyUnit 2 IPPenologyCRJS335 - 1404B - 0110/15/2014Dr. Edward HaleIntroductionDuring the eighteenth century the enlightenment theory emerged which would pave the way for classical...

Biological/psychological factors of crime

1205 words - 5 pages IntroductionThe Positivist School of Criminology rejected the Classical School's idea that all crime resulted from a choice that could potentially be made. Though they did not disagree with the Classical School that most crime could be explained through "human nature," they argued that the most serious crimes were committed by individuals who were...

The study of criminology

523 words - 2 pages Criminology is the scientific study of crime, criminals, criminal behavior, and the criminal justice system. In the United States, it is taught chiefly in departments of criminology and criminal justice of colleges and universities. Criminologists study factors related to crime. Research in criminology...

population

738 words - 3 pages Week Four: Classical conditioning essayAisha YakubPsy 390January 13 2013Gerald Thauberger

Criminology: The Evolution of Crime

1496 words - 6 pages Criminology has evolved over history into becoming a discipline all its own, along the way it grew and developed from a multiple sources of disciplines to become an integration of various theories. Reasons that seek to explain crime and deviant behaviors has mirrored the time in which research was being conducted and as time continues to change it is to be expected more theories will arise to incorporate past theories to become ever more...

Factors Affecting the Complexity of Criminal Behavior

1615 words - 6 pages This essay will consider the notion that any person could become a criminal. In considering this, the question ‘what makes a criminal a criminal’ will be discussed. Defining criminal behaviour is itself, difficult as it could be considered a wide range of behaviours from tasting fruit at the market to speeding to swearing at someone in frustration. Further to this discussion is a consideration of the roles that society and individuals have in...

Outline and evaluate what you take to be the achievements of feminist criminology

1922 words - 8 pages Criminology covers a whole multitude of approaches to the study of crime and deviance. Over the last 30 years feminist perspectives have challenged theories, concepts, and assumptions of much of the classical criminological work. They state that gender issues have been hidden in criminology. Feminists argue that men are the dominant group within society and have therefore...

Application of criminology theories to movies

2907 words - 12 pages The TrackerThe film also presents a critical question of which law is closest to a consensual perspective of justice: the fanatic or trackers?It reveals an Aboriginal perspective, which allows them to define and apply their own version of deviance onto white Australia with the colonial period.The film contains references to Positivism,

Sexual Assault in Australia

1044 words - 4 pages Sexual assault is the act of sexual intercourse without consent of the other person according to New South Wales Consolidation Act of 1900 (Austlii 2011) and is also described by the Australian Standard Offence Classification as ‘non-consensual’ acts or intents of sexual nature (ASOC 2008, p. 31) has become one of the most predominate crimes creating social harm in Australia. Social harm is defined as the negative influence through consequences...

Beginning with the so called "Enlightenment" this essay briefly describes the origins of criminological thought.

749 words - 3 pages The Origins of criminological thoughtThe EnlightenmentCriminal thought and processes first came into fruition during the enlightenment. This phrase was often used by the writers of the time, who were convinced that they were emerging from centuries of darkness and ignorance into the dawning of a new era enlightened by reason, logic, science, and respect for humanity. The "classical period" is very important as the period provided...

0 thoughts on “Classical Theory Of Crime Essay Topics

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *